Food and supplements

Although product labelling must be taken into account when purchasing all goods, it is crucial when it comes to food.
IN QUESTIONS RELATED TO FOOD, PLEASE CONTACT THE AGRICULTURE AND FOOD AUTHORITY (CONTACTS: ADDRESS TEADUSE 6A, SAKU, HARJUMAA 75501; E-MAIL: PTA@PTA.AGRI.EE; PHONE +372 605 1710).
THE AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD AUTHORITY SHALL CARRY OUT NATIONAL SUPERVISION IN ALL BUSINESS AREA AND MATERIALS AND ARTICLES FOR ARTICLE 47 2 OF EC REGULATION No 1935 / 2004 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL.

The labelling of foodstuffs must not be misleading: in accordance with the requirements for labelling foodstuffs, the labelling must contain correct information about the nature, composition, origin and other essential characteristics of the foodstuff.

The labelling of foodstuffs must include, among other things, the name of the product, the list of ingredients in descending order, the net quantity, the shelf life date, storage or use requirements, the contact information of the manufacturer, packager or seller and the country of origin.

Do not buy food if

  • the environment is dirty;
  • the clothes and / or hands of the seller are dirty;
  • the packaging of the goods is broken;
  • the goods are not stored under the right conditions;
  • you can see that the frozen food is thawed and then frozen again.
  • If you have purchased a food that has not expired,

But if you open the package and it turns out that the product has gone bad, go straight to the store where the goods were sold to you. Be sure to bring a receipt for the goods and make a written request for a refund at the store. Dealers usually handle complaints on a case-by-case basis and usually in the consumer's favor.

According to the Food Act, a food supplement is used to supplement normal foods and a concentrated source of nutrients or other substances with nutritional or physiological effects on humans.

Food supplements are sold both individually and in combination. Food supplements are, for example, oral preparations made from vitamins and minerals, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, lecithin, garlic powder and the like.

Dietary supplements are not meant to treat or alleviate diseases, nor are they a substitute for a healthy diet and should not be consumed for no reason, as excessive consumption of dietary supplements can be harmful to the body. Most people get all the substances they need from a balanced diet. Compared to a vitamin capsule, for example, it is possible to obtain a more diverse selection of substances necessary for the body from fresh fruits and vegetables, which are also in proportion to intake.

Take a critical view of the advertising of dietary supplements. It is reasonable to be skeptical when promising claims are made on the label or advertisement of a dietary supplement. Do not believe in claims about the prevention or treatment of disease, because diet is just one of many factors that influence the cure of a disease. Often, a product does not have the miracle effect claimed in the advertisements. For example, when consuming raspberry ketones advertised online as slimming wonder capsules, there was no slimming effect.

Read and follow the instructions for use of the dietary supplement. The pack contains the recommended daily intake of the dietary supplement, which you should not exceed. If necessary, consult a doctor. It is essential to consult your GP or pharmacist before giving children a dietary supplement, even if the product is intended for children.

Find out who sells the food supplement. Food supplements are subject to the same requirements in the European Union, whether the product is sold in a shop, pharmacy, post office or online. However, if you buy a food supplement, e.g. online from outside the EU, it may not comply with EU requirements. Therefore, always check the country where the seller is registered before buying.

Remember!

  • Find out who is selling the supplement and what information is available about the seller.
  • If you are unable to identify the seller of the product or if the information found about the seller and the incorrect product information raises doubts, do not purchase the product.
  • Read the instructions for use of the supplement and consume the product wisely.

Energy drinks are soft drinks that contain carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, caffeine and other active ingredients, including taurine, glucuronolactone and creatine.

  • Be aware that energy drinks can have different effects depending on the quantity and composition of active ingredients. In some countries, some retailers restrict the sale of energy drinks to children. The Consumer Protection Bureau supports a similar initiative by Estonian retailers.
  • Do not confuse energy and sports drinks: energy drinks contain caffeine, which promotes the excretion of water from the body and increases blood pressure. Sports drinks contain carbohydrates and electrolytes as energy sources to compensate for the minerals lost through sweat.
  • The authority has advised retailers not to use children's or children's literature or children's programming characters or children's cartoon characters for advertising energy drinks, as this may cause children to have an excessive interest in what is advertised. It is also not recommended to sell energy drinks in buffets and cafes in children's facilities.

An energy drink must be labeled "high in caffeine" if the drink contains more than 150 milligrams of caffeine per liter. You must also find out how many milligrams of caffeine are contained in 100 milliliters of a drink by looking at the packaging of such a drink.

From 13 December 2014, energy drinks must be labelled "Not recommended for children, pregnant women or breastfeeding women."

Last updated: 08.04.2021